Spring Ahead With These Seasonal Safety Tips for Your Pet

This Sunday, March 20, we can officially welcome spring! While almost everyone loves the onset of springtime, the season arrives with its own hazards for pets. With that in mind AND National Poison Prevention Week also beginning on the 20th, we've compiled a listing of spring pet safety tips so you and your animal friends can enjoy the season to its fullest:

Gardening Poisons

In our part of the country, we emergency veterinarians see many pets hospitalized for ingesting slug and snail baits that contain metaldehyde. This particular substance causes seizures if ingested. Prompt treatment is needed to save your pet’s life. Compost also contains mold compounds that lead to seizures. If you do compost, keep the pets away!

Easter Lilies

Those beautiful white trumpets that many people buy this time of year – along with some of their cousins that aren’t necessarily white – can lead to severe kidney failure and death in cats. This is one of those poisons where you don’t want to wait to see how your cat does. Prompt and aggressive treatment is necessary. If you live with cats, keep lilies out of your home!

Via the AAFP

Chocolates

Not all those chocolate Easter eggs and chocolate bunnies will be found by the children! Some will be found by your dog, either in the yard, in the house, and, in some instances, in your car on the way home from the grocery store! Chocolate – especially baker’s chocolate and dark chocolate – is toxic to pets no matter what the season.

Daffodils, Jonquils, Narcissus

Most of us are excited to see these bloom this time of the year. Most animals will not readily eat these leaves, which can look like thick blades of grass. However, some dogs and cats will attempt to play with them, and we know that cats and dogs sometimes chew on things they play with. These plants contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause severe internal swelling of the throat and, if severe enough, will stop your pet from breathing if the throat swells shut.

The Easter Ham, Turkey, Roast

No matter what you are feasting on, keep it out of reach of your pet! Things can sometimes get a little hectic with family and friends over. If you leave a tempting dish unattended on the counter or table ... or even in an easily accessed garbage can, chances are it will be devoured by your furry friend. Dramatic changes in diet such as gorging on the Easter ham can cause gastrointestinal upset and pancreatitis. Also: Watch out for any bones!


By Joe Musielak, DVM, PVH Small-Animal Emergency Department

Related Resources

Five New Year’s Resolutions for Your Horse

(From a Veterinarian’s Point of View)

Each year, you make a New Year’s resolution for yourself, but what about what you could be doing for your horse? Your trainer wants you to work on half passes, sliding stops, higher jumps or whatever your discipline may be ... but what does your veterinarian want you to focus on?

  1. Weight: Maintaining your horse’s weight, whether you have an easy-keeper or thin horse, should be high on this year’s priority list. Overweight horses are predisposed to conditions such as equine metabolic syndrome and laminitis. Laminitis can be very difficult to manage and can be career-ending and potentially even life-threatening. For thin horses, the root cause of the problem can be even trickier to diagnose. Is it nutritional, dental or due to another serious disease such as pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (equine Cushing’s) or cancer?
  2. Dental care: On average, it is recommended that you have your horse’s mouth examined and floated once yearly. Skipping years of oral balancing, performed during the dental float, can potentially lead to serious misalignments such as creating jaw-locking steps, painful hooks and significant periodontal disease.
  3. Preventive care: The importance of vaccines cannot be stressed enough. Did you know that the best time of year to vaccinate for Eastern/Western encephalitis and West Nile is in the spring and early summer? These neurologic diseases are carried by mosquitoes, so it is best to boost your horse’s immunity to these prior to bug season. Another component of preventive care is parasite control. A vast majority of equine parasites are actually carried by a small percentage of horses. Fecal floats quantify how much an individual horse is affected by parasites and have completely changed deworming protocols. Now, deworming is tailored to the individual horse to prevent parasite resistance through unnecessary deworming.
  4. Senior care: Horses are frequently living longer, and our retirees start to require more medical care as they age. Common issues that need to be addressed include deteriorating ligaments and arthritis pain, loose teeth, weight/dietary management, and diseases such as Cushing’s and equine metabolic syndrome.
  5. Regular exercise: Busy schedules create horses that are “weekend warriors” – horses that are ridden hard on the weekends and do minimal work during the week. This makes it hard for horses to build up cardiovascular and muscle strength, and can also predispose them to injury in joints, ligaments and muscles. Could you get out to the barn for a longeing session in the middle of the week?

This year, make it your New Year’s resolution to improve your horse’s health. Buckle down on getting your fat horse trimmed down or your thin horse beefed up. Make it your mission to address dental and preventive care. Start a conversation with your veterinarian on how you can help your older horse’s arthritis or if you need to begin testing for diseases such as Cushing’s. Go the extra mile and put another workout in on your horse. Your equine friend will be sure to thank you later!


Article written by Liana Wiegel, DVM

Located in Snohomish, Pilchuck Veterinary Hospital offers equine ambulatory care, referral hospital services and 24/7 emergency. Call 360.568.3111 to schedule a consultation with one of our equine practitioners.

Common Christmas Pet Traps and Pitfalls, and How to Avoid Them!

This year, put your money into your children's (or your own) stockings ... and not into your local veterinary ER! As much as we love to stay busy in our ER, we would rather not have your holiday memories dimmed by an ill-fated accident during the most wonderful time of the year.

What is there to fear?

Several areas of concern quickly come to mind for most longtime pet owners, as well as for veterinary professionals. 

Foreign Bodies

This means typically non-digestible, well, anything. Christmas tree lights, tinsel, the string the popcorn is strung on (especially tasty!), presents, ribbon, wrapping paper, contents from guests' luggage or purses left unguarded, just to name a few. Often due to the house being full of guests and with lots of activity going on, owners are likely to be distracted and there tends to be more clutter lying around than usual.

Dietary Indiscretion

This can include foreign bodies, but usually when we use this phrase we are thinking of the snuck-under-the-dining-table pieces of turkey, the gravy licked off the well-meaning plate, or the chocolate bars you were going to melt down for making fudge. Typically, vomiting and diarrhea are very treatable with proper supportive care, but can be miserable and even fatal without treatment. And the mention of chocolate leads us to ...

Toxins!

  • Chocolate leads the pack here during the holidays. At low doses, baked goods with small amounts of chocolate in them, or one to two pieces of milk chocolate candy, can merely cause stomach and intestinal upset (vomiting/diarrhea), but in smaller patients and at higher doses, we can see heart issues and even seizures. The type of chocolate and the amount (in ounces or grams) and the weight of your pet are the most important pieces of information to call the ER with, if this does happen in your household.
  • Xylitol, a sugar-free sweetener, is also becoming an increasingly common toxin. It's not just in gum anymore – now it is even used in some peanut butter as well as other sugar-free products. This can cause such low blood sugar in dogs that they can go into a hypoglycemic coma and will not survive without a source of IV dextrose (i.e., medical sugar); they can also suffer liver complications. Make sure people check their purses SECURELY at the door. Most cases I have seen came from dogs that raided someone's purse.
  • Poinsettias are commonly referred to as toxic, but actually simply cause drooling and GI upset/irritation due to irritation of the mucous membranes. They can cause dermal irritation if the sap contacts the skin. With some supportive care, they not typically considered a lethal toxin. For skin contact, a bath with warm, soapy water should suffice.
  • Some less common, but still notable, toxins are macadamia nuts, mold toxins from compost/decaying food or organic material, and yeasted bread dough.

Interactions With the Pack

Putting several dogs or cats together who are not entirely used to each other is highly stressful (think about how you feel when you go over to your crowded in-laws' house!). Even pets that are used to each other may interact differently with other people or pets in the mix.

It is wise to separate cats altogether from dogs not in their own family (even if those dogs live with cats, they are different cats, which does matter when it comes to prey drive). If a dog growls or snaps, or the cat hisses or swats, they are actually giving a warning that they are uncomfortable. The best thing is to remove them from the stressful situation and give them space, rather than to chastise them. 

We here at Pilchuck Veterinary Hospital sincerely hope we do NOT see you for any unexpected visits during this busy time of year! Hopefully, with some precautions, many of the above can be avoided. Accidents do happen to the best of us, so please call or come in if you have any concerns at any time.


Article written by Holly Droske, DVM

PVH offers 24/7 emergency care every day of the year, including holidays: 360.568.9111. Read more about our veterinary ER service in Snohomish for dogs and cats.